"classical music is boring"

sockmonkeyrenegade:

groucho-marxism:

Stravinsky’s rite of spring is about a girl who dances herself to death to appease the Russian god of spring.

When it premiered the crowd got so amped up they opened up a mosh pit in the theater and the night would be forever known as the “riot of spring”

There’s a piece in the bassoon repertoire called “Dead Elvis” and when you buy the music you have to contractually agree to only perform the piece in a full Elvis costume.

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(via aallenwalker)

Tags: music

get to know me meme: [4/5] favourite tv shows → teen wolf

what do you mean, scott? there’s always hope.

(via arden-cho)

Tags: tw

nentindo:

kidshade:

ediebrit:

IM FUCKING SCREAMING

IM IN FUCKING STITCHES 

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the only thing funnier than this video are the comments on it

(via geothebio)

zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned. By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse. Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them. But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather. Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned.
By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse.
Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them.
But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather.
Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

(via catnippackets)

my-friend-the-frog:

its weird to grow up and suddenly all ur friends are married

(via afractionof)

daunt:

kendrawcandraw:

"I can float them in some hot water if you’d really prefer.""Just hand them over, you dummy"
A “get well” commission for Cara, commissioned by the lovely Daunt! Feel better Cara!!!! :*****

PERFECTION

daunt:

kendrawcandraw:

"I can float them in some hot water if you’d really prefer."
"Just hand them over, you dummy"

A “get well” commission for Cara, commissioned by the lovely Daunt! Feel better Cara!!!! :*****

PERFECTION

daunt:

michellicopter:

i bought some new markers and a tan-toned sketchbook and this shit is how i break it in

lord have mercy this is so cute;;;;

daunt:

michellicopter:

i bought some new markers and a tan-toned sketchbook and this shit is how i break it in

lord have mercy this is so cute;;;;

softlycanthropy:

Derek has a type— or a complex.

(via daunt)

odinsblog:

racebending:

If you’ve seen Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, you may have noticed something a little weird about the semi-Biblical, semi-apocalyptic cast of the movie: they’re all white. Even the extras.

In an interview with The Higher Calling, Noah screenwriter Ari Handel spoke about the reasoning behind the lack of racial diversity in the cast.

“From the beginning, we were concerned about casting, the issue of race. What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people. Either you end up with a Bennetton ad or the crew of the Starship Enterprise. You either try to put everything in there, which just calls attention to it, or you just say, ‘Let’s make that not a factor, because we’re trying to deal with everyman.’

Looking at this story through that kind of lens is the same as saying, ‘Would the ark float and is it big enough to get all the species in there?’ That’s irrelevant to the questions because the questions are operating on a different plane than that; they’re operating on the mythical plane.”

In summary, white people are stand-ins “for all people,” and no other race could possibly qualify for “everyman” status. Ari Handel’s reasoning is that the only way to dispense with the issue of racism is to remove everyone who isn’t white. Asking what happened to all the other races is akin to nitpicking about whether the arc would float or not. It’s just silly, OK? “The race of individuals doesn’t matter,” which is why they made absolutely sure that all of those individuals were white. Or something.

Unintentionally, Handel managed to illustrate everything that’s wrong with the ongoing attitude towards casting actors of color in major Hollywood movies. White people are the norm, and everyone else is just a distraction. God forbid anyone attempt to be as diverse as the cast of the Star Trek, which debuted in 1966 and included a grand total of two non-white characters.

[READ MORE]

Normative whiteness at work.

"The race of individuals doesn’t matter"…as long as they’re all White

(Source: hellotailor, via essayofthoughts)